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What’s the most praiseworthy content marketing software you’ve uncovered today?

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B2B Content Marketing Examples

B2B marketing can sometimes seem to play second fiddle to its more glamorous sister, B2C marketing. When it comes to content marketing, campaigns built for consumer audiences are often more intuitive, more fun, or more colorful for the audiences and the marketers who implement them alike. However, as I like to tell my graduate students, marketers get tired of our own marketing way faster than our audiences do.

When it comes to B2B marketing, your content marketing campaigns can be highly valuable, highly sought after, and highly relevant to your audiences. These campaigns resonate most strongly when you are focused on your audiences’ goals, challenges, and mindsets.

Here are five B2B content marketing examples from companies that understand their audiences well and use their content marketing to provide Youtility.

CES Tech Talk Podcast Distills Key Takeaways

B2B Content Lesson: Leverage Your Experts and Break Down the Facts Through a Podcast

CES is such a huge trade show that there is no way that attendees can absorb even a tenth of the content, information, and demos that are presented at the event. How can the Consumer Technology Association, which puts on this massive annual event, create more value for its audiences, reinforce its reputation year-round, and extend its reach?

It produces robust content as part of its marketing approach, such as its Tech Talk Podcast. Each episode of the podcast features industry experts going deep on one specific topic area, such as tech in healthcare, self-driving cars, or the future of innovation.

This series leverages the experts that the organization is already working with and builds upon the brand recognition of its marquee event to build an audience of loyal listeners. This series works particularly well, because it synthesizes the information around each topic area into what you need to know today, as Michael Barbaro of The New York Times says in his podcast, “The Daily.”

B2B Content Example from CES

The CES Tech Talk Podcast is a great example of B2B content marketing.

Athena Health Teaches Business Skills Through Webinars

B2B Content Lesson: Help Solve Their Other Problems

I was recently asked by a client what kind of content they should be publishing for their audience that doesn’t give away the types of frameworks that they offer as part of their services.

While I actually believe you CAN give away some of your frameworks (see the next example), an effective type of content for B2B brands is acknowledging the kind that acknowledges that problem that your product or service solves isn’t the (only) one that’s keeping your client up at night.

For instance, Athena Health is a provider of a suite of services such as electronic health records (EHR) and medical billing. But they offer webinars that help their clients deal with their most critical business challenges: to improve the ways in which they run their practices, recognizing that doctors don’t necessarily have MBAs and don’t always know how to grow their businesses effectively.

B2B Content Marketing Example from AthenaHealth

Webinars from AthenaHealth help their clients deal with their most critical business challenges — excellent example of B2B content marketing.

Convince & Convert (This Very Blog) Gives Away Tools & Frameworks

B2B Content Lesson: Provide Your Recipe to Build Trust and Authority

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you may have noticed that we actually give you quite a lot of tools and frameworks that we use with our clients. That’s because we recognize that for B2B businesses like ours, there is a difference between the DIY segments and the segments that want you to help them take those frameworks and put them to good use for their organizations.

Therefore, we give away templates, like the one in this example, along with a video and blog post to explain to visitors how to use it. It builds trust, and when those visitors (maybe like you!) are ready to take their digital marketing practices to the next step, we are already at the top of their list in terms of trust and authority. Not only does it build trust, it also helps us to build an audience—content like this has great value in search. 

B2B Content Marketing Example from our blog

In this B2B content marketing example, we offer a downloadable template, along with a vide introduction.

Mailchimp Profiles Its Customers on Instagram

B2B Content Lesson: Showcase Your Community of Users

For many B2B companies, social proof takes the form of reviews or testimonials; however, as more and more B2B decision makers turn to social media, creating content that reflects your community is vital. In fact, 51% of all B2B customers turn to social media to do initial research, according to Accenture.


51% of all B2B customers turn to social media to do initial research.

Click To Tweet


Furthermore, the lines between social media and content marketing are blurring more than ever. More often than not, the content that our teams are creating live on social media channels, rather than on our websites. Therefore, looking at ways to create content within social media makes a ton of sense.

Mailchimp, for example, has used its Instagram account as a place to showcase the stories of what its customers are achieving every day, their creativity, and their stories to showcase the kinds of people who use Mailchimp to power their businesses. It publishes microprofiles on each Instagram post. 

It showcases their ethos, and it reassures potential users that they’ve found their tribe.

B2B content example from Mailchimp

In this example of great B2B content, Mailchimp uses its Instagram account as a place to showcase the stories of what its customers are achieving every day, their creativity, and their stories to showcase the kinds of people who use Mailchimp to power their businesses.

CMI Facilitates Conversation Through Monthly Twitter Chats

B2B Content Lesson: Create Points of Interaction

If we’re talking about strong examples of B2B content marketing, what better place to turn that Content Marketing Institute itself? CMI not only educates marketers, but it also connects them through events like Content Marketing World.

An ongoing example of its content marketing practice is its monthly #CMWorld Twitter chat, where guests are invited to answer pre-selected questions, posed by a moderator, while Twitter users participate in answering those same questions, asking each other questions, and picking the brains of the guest. It’s like “Inside the Actors Studio” if the audience were up on stage participating too.

Not only does this approach create a strong network of devoted brand followers, but it (like our first example) helps the brand to leverage and extend its marquee brand. In this case, Content Marketing World’s #cmworld hashtag gets to be used once a week, rather than for one week a year. This keeps it front and center, when it comes to marketing conversations (their key market).

B2B content marketing example

The #CMIWorld Twitter chat is an ongoing example of CMI’s content marketing practice.

Remember: As you’re developing your B2B content marketing campaigns, keep in mind your target audiences’ goals, challenges, and mindsets. If you are able to address those specific areas and make it easy for them to do so, your content will resonate and be effective.

The post 5 B2B Content Marketing Examples You Can Copy appeared first on Content Marketing Consulting and Social Media Strategy.

Drop a comment below if you’ve found anything cool for authors!

https://econsultancy.com/marketing-in-the-new-normal-coronavirus-paul-ralph-consultant-educational-publishing/

Paul Ralph is a marketing consultant in the educational publishing sector (you can check out his website here).

When I put the call out on Econsultancy’s Guild messaging group, to ask our subscribers how their work life has changed in the last month, Paul was quick to offer his thoughts.

Here’s what he had to say about marketing in the new normal…

Please describe your job: What do you do?

I am a self-employed marketing consultant specialising in the Educational and English Language Teaching publishing sectors.

The bulk of my work is around strategic marketing issues. For example, my more recent assignments have included:

  • Advising on organisational structure/future marketing capabilities
  • Developing a global channel partner strategy for a digital educational product
  • Reviewing the global strategy for a specific sector based on a 5-year view of trends in education/technology/marketing etc.

How has your typical day been impacted in the short term by the pandemic?

From August to December 2019 I had no paid work coming in (for no particular reason although the break was welcome). Then from January this year things started cranking up again. Until the pandemic.

The pandemic has caused me to cancel face-to-face meetings and the major teacher’s conference I would have attended in April has been cancelled. This has, in previous years, been my most valuable networking event, and usually one or more major assignments have come about as a direct result of meetings held with exhibitors at the conference.

The big change for me isn’t that I am working from home as I am, by now, used to that. It is that my clients (Marketing Directors, Heads of Marketing) are working from home, as are their clients (Education Managers, Teachers and Learners). Not only are they adapting to the changes involved in working from home but they are respectively having to come to terms with the deeper impact on the business, and adapting to a new way of teaching and learning. This is before you consider wider societal stresses and personal challenges or tragedies; the two biggest markets for UK-published English Language Teaching textbooks are Spain and Italy.

At this time of year my focus would typically be on seeking new business either through approaching existing clients or seeking new ones. As a result of the pandemic my expectations have changed and I do not assume I will get any paid contracts in the coming months. My main objective is stay in contact with existing clients if they want to during this period and to provide support where I can.

I appreciate not all business or freelancers have the luxury of following this approach. It is worth pointing out that this work is not my chief source of revenue and while my aim to is keep active, it is not essential for my financial security to run a full-time business.

paul ralph

What are your favourite tools and techniques to help you get your work done at the moment?

I am used to working from home and use the same basic tools as before. Laptop, phone, Skype, etc. I generally fall into line with my clients’ established modes of communication be it Skype or Google Hangout or whatever. I have not yet tried Zoom. I found the tips in Econsultancy’s recent remote working webinar useful and shared the details with key contacts.

What trends have you seen in the last few weeks in your sector?

In educational publishing marketers are focussing on providing quality free content aimed at supporting teachers, learners, and parents with online teaching and learning. This content consists of videos, blogs, webinars, and lesson ideas and is typically flagged up prominently on the website home page and featured via the existing social media platforms.

Most textbooks now have an online learning component designed for homework if not a full e-book version. Ensuring teachers and learners are supported in making the best use of these digital tools is a priority and there is evidence there has been increased engagement with these resources since lockdown.

Face-to-face professional development events, teaching conferences, author tours etc. have all been cancelled and again, there is evidence that engagement with webinars and e-conferences has increased. The tens of thousands of school sales visits normally scheduled around the world at this time of year have been replaced by phone visits where appropriate or possible.

These are very sensible customer-centric responses to the current crisis, but also relatively tactical. Working out the longer-term implications of the pandemic is a challenge in educational publishing as in all sectors.

While many consumer brands will be experiencing an immediate and harmful drop off in sales (e.g. clothing, hotels, airlines), the consequences of the current crisis are highly disruptive for educational publishing but, the impact is felt differently due to the cyclical nature of purchasing patterns, linked to the academic year.

Mainstream educational publishers are highly dependent on sales of print textbooks sold largely through third party wholesalers (national, regional). The duration of the lockdown and the resilience of these offline channel partners – along with their networks of booksellers – will be key in determining the gravity and depth of the crisis. The textbook business (particularly outside the UK) is cyclical, with a huge chunk of annual sales often condensed into a 2-3 week local back-to-school sales season (typically September/October in Europe).

Managing the supply chain, stock levels, partner relationships and onwards distribution of the print textbooks – along with the underlying assumptions (will schools be open or closed, whether to delay launches or go ahead) will be the largest business challenges faced (in my view). In the worst-impacted markets it is hard to imagine that the launches of new products will not be delayed. Ensuring teaching and learning can resume in the new academic year with the right educational resources either physically in place or available and properly supported online.

What changes are you making to help your brand connect with how people are feeling and experiencing the pandemic?

My starting position is that I am not expecting to pick up any new contracts over the next few months. If I do, it will be an unexpected bonus.

My focus will be on my existing clients and contacts, and quietly letting them know (by personal email) I am there to listen if they want to talk or available if they just need a chat to break up the day.

I am prepared to be generous with my time if that is what the client wants or needs, but I will not pursue them aggressively. When I have useful tools or insights to share (such as the Econsultancy remote working webinar – I will pass it on).

I think humility is important here. As a Sales Director/Marketing Director/Board Member I never went through what my colleagues are experiencing now. So while I can lend a sympathetic ear, I have as much if not more to learn right now from them than they do from me.

Which companies have impressed you since the outbreak?

I thought Mark Ritson’s article In Marketing Week was interesting in this respect. Firms have to balance financial sustainability with a duty of care to their employees and retaining strong customer focus and empathy. There also needs to be sensitivity to stake-holders (not least suppliers and channel partners) and any wider societal issues.

I have been impressed by the flexibility of local businesses in my area to reinvent themselves: restaurants suddenly providing home delivery, food wholesalers delivering directly to consumers (a schools and hotels are all closed), the local fruit and veg market traders delivering veg boxes to your front door. They have all had to transform overnight to direct selling operations often with little or no online shop or ecommerce systems in place. Being linked into local community pages (Facebook and Next Door) have helped them get their message out virally.

In the UK, the citizens’ response to the government’s call for volunteers has been remarkable. It is good to see some firms doing their bit, whether it be cosmetics firms putting aside production capacity for hand sanitiser, fashion businesses making masks and scrubs, or academic publishers freeing access to all research papers relevant to Covid-19.  Seeing Tesco make a donation to support food banks via the Trussell Trust is also an example of business taking a wider societal view.

I think the efforts by educational publishers to support teachers, parents, and learners with home learning resources is a decent customer-sensitive response (see Pearson, Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press).

What does long term planning and strategy look like now at your brand?

I will try to figure out what the longer-term impacts will be on society and educational publishing. It is possible that the digitisation of publishing which has been progressing gradually for at least a decade, will see a permanent step change. Likewise, the relationship between Marketing and Field Sales /educational agents will evolve, with MQLs becoming more significant and more of the customer journey happening online and for a greater percentage of customers.

If these assumptions are correct, what part can I play in helping my clients on their journey? What changes do I need to my offer? Is it something I can deliver alone? Do I need to extend my partner network?

What advice would you give a marketer right now?

  • Stay safe, stay sane, seek help if you need it.
  • Think customer (always).
  • Leaders: be prepared to make some big calls sooner rather than later.
  • All marketers: be prepared to be flexible (mindset, responsibilities, ways of working).
  • Be more careful than ever around messaging – though careful needn’t mean solemn.

Explore Econsultancy resources

The post Marketing in the new normal: Paul Ralph, freelance consultant in educational publishing appeared first on Econsultancy.

What’s the most applicable content marketing insight you’ve shared this year?

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B2B Content Marketing Examples

B2B marketing can sometimes seem to play second fiddle to its more glamorous sister, B2C marketing. When it comes to content marketing, campaigns built for consumer audiences are often more intuitive, more fun, or more colorful for the audiences and the marketers who implement them alike. However, as I like to tell my graduate students, marketers get tired of our own marketing way faster than our audiences do.

When it comes to B2B marketing, your content marketing campaigns can be highly valuable, highly sought after, and highly relevant to your audiences. These campaigns resonate most strongly when you are focused on your audiences’ goals, challenges, and mindsets.

Here are five B2B content marketing examples from companies that understand their audiences well and use their content marketing to provide Youtility.

CES Tech Talk Podcast Distills Key Takeaways

B2B Content Lesson: Leverage Your Experts and Break Down the Facts Through a Podcast

CES is such a huge trade show that there is no way that attendees can absorb even a tenth of the content, information, and demos that are presented at the event. How can the Consumer Technology Association, which puts on this massive annual event, create more value for its audiences, reinforce its reputation year-round, and extend its reach?

It produces robust content as part of its marketing approach, such as its Tech Talk Podcast. Each episode of the podcast features industry experts going deep on one specific topic area, such as tech in healthcare, self-driving cars, or the future of innovation.

This series leverages the experts that the organization is already working with and builds upon the brand recognition of its marquee event to build an audience of loyal listeners. This series works particularly well, because it synthesizes the information around each topic area into what you need to know today, as Michael Barbaro of The New York Times says in his podcast, “The Daily.”

B2B Content Example from CES

The CES Tech Talk Podcast is a great example of B2B content marketing.

Athena Health Teaches Business Skills Through Webinars

B2B Content Lesson: Help Solve Their Other Problems

I was recently asked by a client what kind of content they should be publishing for their audience that doesn’t give away the types of frameworks that they offer as part of their services.

While I actually believe you CAN give away some of your frameworks (see the next example), an effective type of content for B2B brands is acknowledging the kind that acknowledges that problem that your product or service solves isn’t the (only) one that’s keeping your client up at night.

For instance, Athena Health is a provider of a suite of services such as electronic health records (EHR) and medical billing. But they offer webinars that help their clients deal with their most critical business challenges: to improve the ways in which they run their practices, recognizing that doctors don’t necessarily have MBAs and don’t always know how to grow their businesses effectively.

B2B Content Marketing Example from AthenaHealth

Webinars from AthenaHealth help their clients deal with their most critical business challenges — excellent example of B2B content marketing.

Convince & Convert (This Very Blog) Gives Away Tools & Frameworks

B2B Content Lesson: Provide Your Recipe to Build Trust and Authority

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you may have noticed that we actually give you quite a lot of tools and frameworks that we use with our clients. That’s because we recognize that for B2B businesses like ours, there is a difference between the DIY segments and the segments that want you to help them take those frameworks and put them to good use for their organizations.

Therefore, we give away templates, like the one in this example, along with a video and blog post to explain to visitors how to use it. It builds trust, and when those visitors (maybe like you!) are ready to take their digital marketing practices to the next step, we are already at the top of their list in terms of trust and authority. Not only does it build trust, it also helps us to build an audience—content like this has great value in search. 

B2B Content Marketing Example from our blog

In this B2B content marketing example, we offer a downloadable template, along with a vide introduction.

Mailchimp Profiles Its Customers on Instagram

B2B Content Lesson: Showcase Your Community of Users

For many B2B companies, social proof takes the form of reviews or testimonials; however, as more and more B2B decision makers turn to social media, creating content that reflects your community is vital. In fact, 51% of all B2B customers turn to social media to do initial research, according to Accenture.


51% of all B2B customers turn to social media to do initial research.

Click To Tweet


Furthermore, the lines between social media and content marketing are blurring more than ever. More often than not, the content that our teams are creating live on social media channels, rather than on our websites. Therefore, looking at ways to create content within social media makes a ton of sense.

Mailchimp, for example, has used its Instagram account as a place to showcase the stories of what its customers are achieving every day, their creativity, and their stories to showcase the kinds of people who use Mailchimp to power their businesses. It publishes microprofiles on each Instagram post. 

It showcases their ethos, and it reassures potential users that they’ve found their tribe.

B2B content example from Mailchimp

In this example of great B2B content, Mailchimp uses its Instagram account as a place to showcase the stories of what its customers are achieving every day, their creativity, and their stories to showcase the kinds of people who use Mailchimp to power their businesses.

CMI Facilitates Conversation Through Monthly Twitter Chats

B2B Content Lesson: Create Points of Interaction

If we’re talking about strong examples of B2B content marketing, what better place to turn that Content Marketing Institute itself? CMI not only educates marketers, but it also connects them through events like Content Marketing World.

An ongoing example of its content marketing practice is its monthly #CMWorld Twitter chat, where guests are invited to answer pre-selected questions, posed by a moderator, while Twitter users participate in answering those same questions, asking each other questions, and picking the brains of the guest. It’s like “Inside the Actors Studio” if the audience were up on stage participating too.

Not only does this approach create a strong network of devoted brand followers, but it (like our first example) helps the brand to leverage and extend its marquee brand. In this case, Content Marketing World’s #cmworld hashtag gets to be used once a week, rather than for one week a year. This keeps it front and center, when it comes to marketing conversations (their key market).

B2B content marketing example

The #CMIWorld Twitter chat is an ongoing example of CMI’s content marketing practice.

Remember: As you’re developing your B2B content marketing campaigns, keep in mind your target audiences’ goals, challenges, and mindsets. If you are able to address those specific areas and make it easy for them to do so, your content will resonate and be effective.

The post 5 B2B Content Marketing Examples You Can Copy appeared first on Content Marketing Consulting and Social Media Strategy.

What’s the most interesting writing tip you’ve found from this post?

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheWritePractice/~3/psuUPK4kcQw/

Many of us are lucky to have people around us who understand or at least support our writing habits and dreams. But even with the best support, sometimes it feels like my writing is silly in the face of so many other pressing world problems. How do you keep writing when it seems inconsequential?

Why Does Writing Matter? Why You Should Write When You Worry it Doesn't 2

Do you ever feel like your writing doesn’t matter? As we write letters or emails to legislators, fight injustice in our communities, work to preserve the environment, or tamp down panic in the face of a new illness, some days writing feels inconsequential. 

It’s easy to forget why we keep returning to the page each day. Especially when we’re distracted or sick or in crisis. But we can address the difficult things in our lives and still make a little space for the life-giving practice of writing.

I spent some time this week thinking about why writing is so important to me and reminded myself why writing matters. 

3 Reasons Your Writing Matters Right Now

Ever wonder why does writing matter? Or worse, does writing matter? Here are three reasons writing matters. To put it more boldly, here are three reasons your writing matters right now.

1. Write to remember the past

Remembering the past can be comforting, painful, and every emotion in between. But those memories often give meaning to our present lives. 

I lead brainstorming activities with my students each year, helping them step back in time to pluck story seeds. I’ve had them draw a childhood home and annotate the special places. We’ve described childhood bike wrecks and trampoline injuries. They recount building forts and going camping and all kinds of other shenanigans. 

Flannery O’Connor once said, “Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days.” She reminds us that growing up provides us with a rich understanding about life—enough to get us through any current difficulty.

I’ve written those childhood exercises with my students for years and I always discover something new down those old roads that offer hope. We write to remember who we’ve been and what we’ve learned.

2. Write to process the present

My grandmother passed away a couple years ago, and I received dozens of spiral notebooks with her records of daily life. Everything from details about the weather and what she’d planted, to meetings she’d attended and quilts she’d worked on. She told herself jokes and made to do lists and worried over her children and grandchildren. Her notebooks were the place she processed life. 

Some of us, like my granny, journal to process life. Others write stories to help us make sense of the world, identifying problems and solutions, revealing everyday heroes and villains.

Those stories give us language to recognize shared humanity, even as we experience life in different parts of the world and universe, settings we may never visit with characters we may never meet except in our imaginations. 

3. Write to imagine a new future

In episode 3 of the Character Test podcast, Shawn Coyne talked about the importance of telling better stories to help people live better lives.

It stuck with me, because we sometimes perpetuate problems by rehearsing them using old scripts. For example, I hope by now we’re pushing back against harmful stereotypes in stories that always put certain ethnicities in the villain role or only present women as helpless damsels in distress.

We need stories that embrace the complexity and fullness of people, which requires imagination in some contexts where prejudice and “the way things have always been” tend to dominate. 

It comes down to how we respond to the uncertainty around us. At the end of the podcast, Coyne stated his personal code: “When a difficult event comes, the choice for me is the question of whether to create or destroy.”

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Stories Matter Today

Stories connect us and help us make meaning of the time we have here on earth. Whatever challenges you are facing today, don’t discount the power of writing.

What keeps you writing when it feels like it doesn’t matter? Share in the comments

PRACTICE

Set the timer for fifteen minutes and choose one of the exercises below.

Past: Take five minutes and draw a childhood home or place you remember vividly. For me, it’s my grandparents’ acreage. Then, for ten minutes, walk through it in your mind and on the page. What did you learn there and how did you learn it? Write one memory beginning with “I remember…”

Present: Start a journal list of your day. Include the mundane and fantastic and everything in between. Choose one event and explain it in detail—what it entails, why it matters, what it means. (One time I did this exercise, I started with “folding my six-year-old’s laundry” and it ended up reminding me how much little things matter.) 

Future: Make a list of three problems bothering you today. Drop a character into one of those problems and give them the agency and guts to change that world for the better. Don’t make it easy—the more obstacles they overcome, the better.

When your time is up, share your writing in the comments below. And if you share, be sure to leave feedback for three other writers!

The post Why Does Writing Matter? Why You Should Write When You Worry it Doesn’t appeared first on The Write Practice.

What’s the most useful marketing insight you’ve discovered this month?

https://conversionsciences.com/ecommerce-strategies-to-minimize-covid19-impact-on-revenue/

Having trouble viewing the text? You can always read the original article here: 6 Smart Ecommerce Strategies to Minimize COVID-19’s Impact on Revenue

Here are 6 very smart ecommerce strategies that will help you minimize the impact of COVID-19 on your business revenues. Take notes. We like to make business decisions with data. We’ve looked at the data that is available about the coronavirus, COVID-19. Based on our analysis, we believe there is going to be a change […]

The post 6 Smart Ecommerce Strategies to Minimize COVID-19’s Impact on Revenue appeared first on Conversion Sciences.

Featured Client: Carol Everett-Adams | Writer’s Relief

Submit To Our Review Board

Our Review Board is now open. Submit your prose, poetry, or book today!

DEADLINE: Thursday, April 16th, 2020

Caption: Click on the video above to hear about Carol’s experience with Writer’s Relief!

Meet one of our most unique featured clients, Carol Everett-Adams—the ultimate Disney fan! It’s not every poet whose writing focuses on “the happiest place on earth,” but Carol decided to be true to herself, no matter how “oddball” that might seem. The result? Her poems have been published in Avalon Literary Review, California Quarterly, Euphony, FRiGG, and Ghost City Review, among others.

Read on and watch the video to hear how the research experts at Writer’s Relief were able to find the right journals for Carol’s distinctive poetry themes and help her get published.

In Carol’s Own Words

I am living proof that you can be—should be!—your own wonderful oddball self when you write. Your authentic work will find a home. For example, Disney inhabits my psyche in weird ways, and much of my poetry explores a lifetime obsession with the parks and movies. The way I explain it to myself is that I have Disney issues, and much of my poetry ends up refracted through that prism.

Writer’s Relief has always supported and encouraged my work, and they gave me the traction I needed to launch myself as a published poet. I can’t imagine where I’d be now without my strategy team’s belief in me, their diligence, and their access to information about journals that I would never have had time to dig through myself. And the proofreading is astounding! If you’re serious about your writing, I urge you to make room in your budget to hire Writer’s Relief. For me, their service has ended up being priceless.

More About Carol

Carol Everett-Adams writes poems about Disney theme parks, organized religion, UFOs, and other strange topics. She lives in the midwestern United States and works in the tech industry. Her poetry has appeared in The MacGuffin, The New York Quarterly, Owen Wister Review, Pennsylvania English, Quercus Review, Soundings East, Sweet Tree Review, The Virginia Normal, Westview, and many other literary journals. Carol believes poems grounded in imagery and memory of specific locations are powerful forces of connection, and is now focused on helping other writers and world travelers create their own Poems of Place.

You can learn more about Carol by visiting her website.